Mauricio Manhaes
Author - Mauricio Manhaes

A session was held during the 2016 Service Design Global Conference to reflect on the academic challenges that service design is currently facing and how they can be overcome by the SDN community.

Abstract

Based on the service research priorities of Ostrom et al. (2010; 2015), an academic session was held during the 2016 Service Design Global Conference to reflect on the academic challenges that service design is currently facing. The session started with a brief elaboration on the cited publications, followed by a summary of two academic service design experiences: the Marie Curie Service Design for Innovation Network - SDIN sponsored by the EU, and the Service Design undergraduate and graduate programs of the Savannah College of Art and Design - SCAD. Ensuing the presentations, the session was structured as a World Café throughout which the 12 participants were divided into three discussion groups. Collaboratively, the participants produced discourse elements on how the academic service design research environment can be encouraged and supported by the Service Design Network (SDN) community. The final outcome is a list of participants’ perceptions constituting six academic priorities for the service design community:

  1. Define a theoretical research base to delineate academic boundaries for service design research;
  2. Leverage descriptive research on service design;
  3. Structure a directory of academic researchers promoting service design as a research topic and institute academic connections with other research fields;
  4. Recognise and understand the non-existence of a commonly accepted definition for service design;
  5. Examine the role big data and digital tools can have in service design group dynamics of co-creation;
  6. Support the creation of an outlet for service design academic research papers.

More important than defining actions to address every suggested service design academic priority, this present text highlights one specific opportunity that could foster all of them simultaneously. Participants emphasised the value of creating a blind peer-reviewed academic journal (Priority #6), which could focus on publishing research papers on the other identified service design priorities (Priorities #1, #2, #4 and #5). The very establishment of such an academic journal would require a set of committed academic researchers (Priority #3), who view service design as a research domain and enable calls for publication to move service design in academia forward. This article is relevant through outlining, for the first time and by a service design interested group, six priorities for service design in order to grow its significance in academia. Furthermore, it demonstrates how the creation of a blind peer-reviewed academic journal focused on service design can act as a cornerstone opportunity to support all of the previously named priorities.

Keywords
Research priorities, service design, academic, research, community.

Full Text
The full text can be accessed here.

Acknowledgements
The authors would like to acknowledge the valuable contribution made by the participants of the academic session and, especially, the comments and contributions made to this text by Associate Professor Dr. Wolfgang Vorraber, Graz University of Technology; Berit Godfroij, Research Group Co-Design, Utrecht University of Applied Sciences; Professor Mauricio Bejarano Botero, Services Design and Consumer Behavior Professor, Universidad EAFIT. This project has partially received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement Nº 642116 and from the School of Design at the Savannah College of Art and Design.

More important than defining actions to address every suggested service design academic priority, this present text highlights one specific opportunity that could foster all of them simultaneously.

Six Priorities to Promote Service Design in Academia -- Mauricio Manhaes; Anna-Sophie Oertzen; Birgit Mager; and Jürgen Tanghe.
Six Priorities to Promote Service Design in Academia Mauricio Manhaes; Anna-Sophie Oertzen; Birgit Mager; and Jürgen Tanghe.
Maurício Manhaes
Maurício Manhaes - Professor of Service Design at the Savannah College of Art and Design and an Associate Design Researcher at Livework.

Maurício Manhães is a Professor of Service Design at the Savannah College of Art and Design and an Associate Design Researcher at Livework. In 2015, he obtained a Doctoral degree in Knowledge Management at the Federal University of Santa Catarina with the thesis "Innovativeness and Prejudice: Designing a Landscape of Diversity for Knowledge Creation." He often conducts workshops, classes, and lectures on service innovation in several countries.

Anna-Sophie Oertzen
Anna-Sophie Oertzen - Early Stage Researcher at the Service Design for Innovation Network (SDIN)

Anna-Sophie Oertzen is an Early Stage Researcher at the Service Design for Innovation Network (SDIN) funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program. As a PhD candidate, she is currently employed by KISD, the Köln International School of Design, and enrolled at Maastricht University in the Netherlands. Anna-Sophie Oertzen holds a BSc and a MSc in Strategy and Innovation from Maastricht University and a MSc in Management from Nova School of Business and Economics in Lisbon, Portugal.

Birgit Mager
Birgit Mager - President of Global Service Design Network, Service Design Professor at KISD, Germany

Since 1995, Birgit Mager has been Professor of Service Design at KISD, the Köln International School of Design, based in Cologne, Germany. Over the past eighteen years, she has been a leading figure in developing the theory and practice of service design. Her publications and lectures have contributed to the establishment of service design as an independent research discipline. Birgit Mager is the president of the International Service Design Network (SDN) and is responsible for organizing SDN‘s national and international conferences.

Jürgen Tanghe
Jürgen Tanghe - Director at Livework, and a Lecturer at TU Delft, Faculty Industrial Design Engineering.

Jürgen Tanghe is Director at Livework, where he leads the business design and service transformations projects and a Lecturer at TU Delft, Faculty Industrial Design Engineering.

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