Service Design Glossary

We at the SDN are thrilled to share with you our brand new SDN Glossary!
This glossary can be a helpful resource for service designers because there are numerous terms used in the service design industry.
Many terms have variations, and new terms are added daily, so it's important to stay current. Explore our SDN Glossary and learn new terms, what they mean, why they matter in the service design field, and how you can apply them to your service design work. 

 

Stay Tuned!

Service Design choreographs processes, technologies, and interactions within complex systems in order to co-create value for relevant stakeholders. (Birgit Mager, 2012)

Service design is the practice of designing services. It uses a holistic and highly collaborative approach to generate value for both the service user and the service provider throughout the service’s lifecycle.

In practice, service design helps to choreograph the processes, technologies and interactions driving the delivery of services, using a human-centred perspective. Service design today is applicable across multiple sectors, helping to deliver strategic and tactical objectives for both the private and public sector. (SDN, 2019)

 --

The tangible or intangible medium upon which a service provider comes in contact with the service user. 

 --

The role in a service scenario which makes use of the service without necessarly paying for it. 

 --

Extended journey map with an explicit visualisation of the emotional reaction of the users throughout the process. 

 --

A specific term describing a type of user: In this case, one that has an existing transactional relationship with the service provider. 

 --

The act of involving the end-users and other stakeholders of a service in the design of (elements of) the service itself. 

 --

The process by which concepts (or ideas) are generated. The process is structured around specific exercises aimed at generating ideas that may be evaluated later for possible applications. 

 --

Exploration refers to the phase of activity in which a team determines the context for the design work they will undertake. This includes an understanding of the user groups and stakeholders in a service, external factors, competitors, existing service experience, etc. 

 --

It describes the step moving into production and rollout. It can involve various fields, such as change management, software, and product developement, engineering, architecture, and construction. 

 --

Refers to the domain of service elements (touchpoints or processes) that are visible or perceptible to end user of the service. 

 --

Refers to the domain of service elements (touchpoints or processes) that are invisible to end user of the service. 

 --

A service blueprint shows systems and processes that must be in place to delivered a desired service experience. In the same manner a customer journey, it follows the progression of a user through a service (or phase of a service), and shows the underlying elements that come into play. These can be activities and roles played by people and or systems, some of which are visible to the user (typically, "front stage"), and others which are invisible ("back stage"). 

A service blueprint is crucial to accomplishing the orchestration of different touchpoints to provide a holistic experience. It can also serve as one of the final deliverables of a service design engagement, because it can be used as a briefing document (specification) for detailed, touchpoint design activities, such as UX design. 

 --

A visual diagram displaying the importance of and relationships between actors within a service ecosystem. This diagram exclusively displays actors who have direct or indirect influence on a service provision, service delivery systems, or individuals within the service ecosystem. 

 --