SDN Team
Author - SDN Team

We asked leading practitioners giving talks and workshops at the Service Design Global Conference to answer the 3 key questions. Today we asked Karin Lycke, a business designer, to give us her take.

 1) Can you explain what service design is? And how your company implements it / uses that field?

We see service design as multifaceted: as a phase of research and development in the same process, as a methodology in which different types of tools are used, and as a mindset rooted in creative and artistic traditions. It is an emotional and experience based way of solving problems where empathy, invention, and iteration are the differentiators between working with a design mindset in contrast to a business mindset.

At Transformator we have adopted a service design approach to work with our clients to develop strategies for a customer-driven approach, where customer insights is the compass for the organization’s innovation, strategy, goals, culture and behavior. If an organization should be able to deliver on customer insights all of these parts need to interact.  

2) What do you believe is the greatest opportunity for your company using service design?


Understanding the customer, humans, is the foundation of a humanized organization that invests in a total experience for the customer. We can see that organizations that focus on this are also the ones that perform the best. The part of the customer experience that matters most is how people feel when they interact with an organization or service.

However, there is a big difference between having information about the customer and their experience and to really understand what the customer experience means for the organization. We believe the biggest opportunity with service design is the ability to see what needs to be carried forward to create an organization that is serious about delivering a great customer experience. It is then necessary to constantly translate customer insights from the outside in to deliver from inside and out. This task requires a framework for processes, skills, working space, organizational structure and leadership. With service design’s holistic perspective we can create  and enable it.  

3) Can you share three tips for implementing service design in their own practice?

  1.  Never think that the job is done, the customer’s circumstances are constantly changing.  
  2. Dare to ask for outside help to secure that you have the customer's perspective and not your own.
  3. Think both fast and slow; some things take time to get right, some things can and should be done immediately. Sometimes it requires quick results to get everyone onboard. 

 

Figure image

Karin is a passionate and scholarship winning business designer with a background in graphic design and art direction with particular knowledge in brand building. In recent years Karin’s professional focus has been concentrated on human centered design, design strategy and service design.

Read Karin Lycke 's full biography here.

And find out more about her SDGC16 workshop "The Humanized Organization" here.

 

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