Touchpoint Vol. 9 No. 3

Touchpoint – The Journal of Service Design

Touchpoint provides a window into the discussion of service design, facilitating a forum to debate, share and advance the field and its practices. In addition it aims at engaging clients to listen in on the discussion, learn about the field, and become involved in the development and implementation of service design for their organisations.

The three key audiences of the publication are:

  • Service design practitioners
  • Client organisations including businesses, non-profits, and public sector/government
  • Academia

Feature theme: Service Design at Scale

As the interest in service design grows within both private and public sector environments, it faces a number of challenges. One is a question of education and capacity-building for service designers, which we explored in Touchpoint two issues ago (Vol. 9, No. 1). A second is question is how impact of service design activities can be measured in quantitative terms (Vol. 9, No. 2), released during the SDN’s Global Conference in Madrid last month. A third question was the theme of that conference itself: How can service design be applied at scale?

In many cases, service designers find themselves grappling with questions of scale that would have been almost unimagined five years ago: “How can I bring all these stakeholders on board and create a coalition?” “How can I train teams of people across an organisation to carry out this work independently, going forward?” “How can the organisation itself modify and adapt itself in the ways that are necessary to deliver these service improvements?”

'Service Design at Scale' is a question and a challenge that has arisen out of success, but has no simple answers. In this upcoming issue of Touchpoint, we want to bring the community together to share insights and learnings on how we can address the challenges. Amongst the questions we would like to answer:

  • What are examples of service design breaking silos and creating new organisational structures at scale?
  • How can service design capabilities be built within an organisation, and how are coherence and consistency maintained when up-scaling?
  • What are the barriers and drivers experienced in attempts to scale service design? How can those barriers be overcome?
  • How can larger programmes of work be piloted at a small scale to gain traction and prove the value of service design?
  • How might we scale the impact of service design beyond the most commonly expected outputs?
  • How might we strive for desired results of scale, and anticipate any undesired consequences?
  • What are examples of failure when scaling service design, and what can be learned from them?
  • How might we impact corporate strategy and organisational structure with and by design?
  • How might we better communicate the relationship with other design functions and roles within the organisation?

We welcome contributions from agency- and client-side practitioners, educators inside and outside academia, and those in a position to review and reflect on the topic of this theme through their own research.

Regular sections

Besides handing in articles related to this issue’s feature, you are also invited to hand in content for the other regular sections of Touchpoint, which are not related to the theme of the issue:

  • Cross-Discipline: Highlighting the connection between service design and other disciplines
  • Tools and Methods: Introduction to and evaluation of techniques and activities for service design projects
  • Education and Research: Insights from academia and research. 

Abstract submission

At the bottom of this page, you find the 'submit an abstract' button. By clicking the button, the abstract submission form will be shown. On the submission form, you will need to fill in, besides your contact information, the following information:

  • Category: Please arrange your submission in one of the Touchpoint sections (Feature, Cross-Discipline, Tools and Methods, Education and Research).
  • Scope of your contribution: Please indicate which length of article you would prefer to write if your abstract gets accepted. Short article:  700 – 800 words (approx. 2 pages) / Medium article:  1100 – 1400 words (approx. 4 pages) / Long article:  1900 – 2200 words (approx. 6 pages).
  • Title: title of article with 5-8 words.
  • Abstract: Abstract (max. 2000 characters) should outline the objective, the structure and the benefit of your article for the readers.
  • Relevance to service design: Brief description (max. 300 characters) on why your article is interesting to service designers and the service design discipline.
  • Biography:  short biography (max. 300 characters) including background, key activities and projects. 

Language and Tone of Voice

The editorial language of Touchpoint is British English. If you are not a native English speaker, make sure your abstract is proofread by a native speaker before you hand in it.

Touchpoint is a non-academic, rather practice-oriented journal, therefore articles are supposed to be easy in tone, not too academic but rather practical in approach – thus, easy to understand for practitioners, academics as well as laymen interested in service design.

When writing your text please focus on the benefit of your article for the readers – do not only report about project steps, but present project learnings.

Editorial Timeline

19 December 2017: Deadline for abstract submission

10 January 2017: End of abstract evaluation by the Editorial board | Acceptances sent to authors

24 January 2017: Deadline for article submission

25 January - 28 February 2017: Review phase (article may be resent to authors for edition, up to approval)

March 2017: proofreading and layout phase 
April 2017: pre-order (authors enjoy 25% discount on orders of 5 hard copies or more)
10 April 2017: release at SDN website

Become an author of Touchpoint and help to advance the service design field and its practices.

We look forward to your contribution!

We invite you to collaborate on Touchpoint

Submit an abstract
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